Adult Learner Success

https://katenonesuch.com/2013/08/06/adult-learner-success/ ‎Factors that Facilitate Adult Learner Success in the NWT starts with a review of earlier findings:

…we understand that:

  • Non-academic outcomes are qualitative, intangible, subjective, personal, and extensive.
  • Learners gain much more from ALBE programs than academic outcomes suggest.
  • Learners also experience many positive personal and social non-academic outcomes such as:When we value non-academic outcomes we can better understand the full extent of learners’ achievements, especially among learners who face multiple barriers.Learners gain hope and motivation as we understand and value non-academic outcomes.
      • Improved self-confidence.
      • Increased ability to set and achieve goals.
      • Stronger interpersonal relationships.
      • New communication skills.
      • Better practical skills for everyday life.
  • Oral narrative tools are an effective way to assess non-academic outcomes (from page 5 of the report).

The report goes on to discuss six factors that facilitate adult learner  success.

There’s lots here for ABE, Adult Literacy, pre-GED and GED programs outside the Northwest Territories. Great August reading!

Get the report here from the Northwest Territories Literacy Council

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4 thoughts on “Adult Learner Success

  1. Reblogged this on English Language Site for Students and Teachers and commented:
    Kate Nonesuch’s “Working in Adult Literacy” site is an invaluable resource for English language and ABE teachers. She her “Adult Learner Success” page’s index for how to create a safe and engaging learning environment for adults (with 13 focal points) as well as links to teaching strategies for helping adults learn math, reading, writing and spelling skills.

  2. Thank you for linking this!

    I’ve participated in some frustrating high-stakes discussions about what constitutes “success” for learners. Sometimes funders don’t think programs should continue if not enough participants are “successful”…but we practitioners don’t always agree with their definition of “success.”

    I love that this report acknowledges it isn’t just about “moving up to the next level” or “getting your high school diploma” or “moving on to college/university courses.”

love to hear your ideas or experiences!

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